Author Topic: Stuff Lain wrote on 8bc years ago  (Read 640 times)

STereochan

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Stuff Lain wrote on 8bc years ago
« on: February 27, 2013, 01:56:08 AM »

Found this on my external HD while looking through some .sav files, Lain wrote this on 8bc like YEARS ago.
Text is copied 1 to 1 from the text file (which was copied 1 to 1 from the forum).

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The beauty about '8-bit' music, is that you really do not need to master it.
If you run Gameboy, C64, Amiga or any other console setup you wont need to.
But there are others 'like me' who do alot of post-processing (adding 16-bit sounds and stuff) so a 'master' is needed.

If you're looking for a "pro" sound to your tunes you should NOT USE MONO FOR THE LOVE OF GOD WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO MEEEE!!1!11one!!1

If you compose on your computer (no hard-sid/lsdj on gameboy) and are using more than 5 channels, you should read these steps below for a great start to a great master..
If you work with an Imported Wav or other format, and dont want to read all this shit, skip to end.


A good master begins in your tracker program (or the prog where all your sound channels are stored). Stereo imaging and Equalizer is the first two steps that will lead you towards that 'pro' sound lol. Why? For example, if your lead instrument and bas are in the lower frequencies the lead wont get that 'punch' and may get mixed up with the bas itself (if it hits the same octave). Now, imagine if you have 2 more channels with instruments in Low frequency. This is where that Stereo Imaging does MAGIC.

If youre looking for a more 'natural' sound, you may want to reduce the high frequencies on your Bas channels and Kick-drums, and reduce the low frequencies on your main-lead instruments etc.. This is really important beacuse you not only prevent the overlapping of unwanted frequencies and gain of Offset, but you improve the 'resolution' on wich you can work with later (after export to wav/aiff).

If youre working with Reverb check if your DC Offset is null on that track. This is important beacuse Reverb tends to gain alot in the 0-80hz range, so if you have an DC-Auto or Filter /EQ you can reduce that unwanted artifact. The DC Offset should be around 0 when you export or make an MPEG out of your work.

After that you need to find a way to lower those peaks and level your channels.
This is best done with a Limiter/Compressor, apply this on the channels that have those unwanted peaks. Doing so will also make it possible to gain the volume on that channel without clipping it and bring all of your channels to level.
Also, check for unwanted clipping in the 'master' before you export to your prefered non-destructive format or before you move on to MPEG.

There is so much more you could do to your tunes, but remember.. this is 8-bit music, and you dont want to ruin that Retro sound/feel. A tune straigh out of lsdj is pure gold.

--

If youre seeking the 'pro' apps in mastering i can recommend these; (lol i should have just put these in, instead of all that bullshit ;D )

iZotope Ozone - (VST Plug-in)
Sony Soundforge - (Sound editing/recording)
Renoise - (if you dont have this and are using another tracker you FAIL.. GET OUT!)

Now, take your lazy ass and get to work so you can buy all this crap!

Orin

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Re: Stuff Lain wrote on 8bc years ago
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2013, 02:06:26 AM »
"If youre looking for a more 'natural' sound, you may want to reduce the high frequencies on your Bas channels and Kick-drums, and reduce the low frequencies on your main-lead instruments etc.. This is really important beacuse you not only prevent the overlapping of unwanted frequencies and gain of Offset, but you improve the 'resolution' on wich you can work with later (after export to wav/aiff)."

This would have been helpful to know a year ago. And thanks for posting this. Wise words from a 8bit jedi.

Boddrick

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Re: Stuff Lain wrote on 8bc years ago
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2013, 11:01:06 AM »
Yeah from my amateurish perspective, keeping the overlapping of frequencies to an absolute minimum is totally essential. I don't even think it counts as mastering, because it's so fundamental, and you should be thinking about it from the moment you start the song, right through to the final render. Lots of spectral analysers would probably help, although I've yet to get my hands on one. That's tonight's mission. I did hear about a new one this week, I can't remember the name now. You can put it on all the channels whose frequency spectrum you want to monitor, and then just open the VST from one of the tracks, and that will show the spectrum of all the tracks you put the VST on. Very cool. I'll let you guys know if it's any good. 
Follow my progress if you like following people's progress: https://soundcloud.com/boddrick

Re: Stuff Lain wrote on 8bc years ago
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2013, 07:20:03 PM »
Yeah from my amateurish perspective, keeping the overlapping of frequencies to an absolute minimum is totally essential. I don't even think it counts as mastering, because it's so fundamental, and you should be thinking about it from the moment you start the song, right through to the final render.
That is why good arrangements lead to good mixes. You don't need to kill all highs from a kick all the time if you've left space for it, you can end up with a bigger sounding kit this way. (That is some of the purpose of compressor ducking.) Remember that you can always change your sounds to suit different parts of the song.